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By Courtney Alexander,
Digital Marketing Editor
Before becoming the award-winning gospel singer he is today, Deitrick Haddon was gaining inspiration from his family. 
The Detroit, Mich. native began his career at a young age, and was a pastor at Detroit’s Unity Cathedral of Faith prior to becoming a celebrity gospel artist.
Faith has always been a part of Haddon’s life. He grew up in a church and began preaching at the young age of 11. 
Though Haddon is naturally talented, he actually comes from a gifted family.
“I was raised in a singing family,” Haddon said. “All of my brothers and sisters could sing. My father plays the organ and sings, and my mother sings and preaches.
Haddon’s father, Clarence Haddon, was another inspiration for starting a career in gospel music. He saw how members of the church reacted to Haddon’s presence in the church and said his father’s talent was a major motivator.
“I would see my dad preach, sing, and write his songs on the spot on a Sunday morning,” Haddon said. “Songs folks never heard before, but he would tear the church up singing. I would see people run to the altar and fall to their knees, and I was like, ‘I have to sing gospel music.’”
Haddon had other opportunities to expand his career and make music in other genres, but he turned down several opportunities and continued to make gospel music. 
“I had opportunities to sing other music, but I turned down at least four mainstream record deals. I signed a deal, and I had 20 R&B songs,” Haddon said. “The night I signed the deal, I went home praying and thanking God. And he was like don’t go to that studio again, you have to sing gospel. I put more in you than to sing about one thing.”
Gospel music has become more mainstream in recent years, and people find inspiration behind it, Haddon said. 
“Now gospel music is becoming the main thing because people are realizing the need to be inspired. Now R&B is falling off, and gospel is going to the top.”
Working with a label and forming the group, Voices of Unity Choir, taught Haddon about networking and how relationships can open up new opportunities. 
“A small door is an entrance to a large place. Never despise small beginnings or look down on something because you don’t think it’s big,” Haddon said. 
Remaining authentic and trying not to fit into the crowd has taught Haddon that an audience will support you if you remain true to who you are. 
“I don’t believe people trying to fit into anything. I say just be yourself and be authentically you.
Write your songs, and if you produce the product, it’ll sell itself. If you true to who you are, the audience that’s called to hear your sound will support you and hear your sound,” Haddon said. 
Haddon’s upcoming projects include his new film, The Fallen. The Fallen was released on June 30. The film is available on ALLBLK, a streaming service that provides content for Black television and film from AMC. 
“My movie The Fallen is out right now on ALLBLK, and the reviews are coming in like crazy. I need everyone to go and watch that movie. It’s going to blow your mind and bless you,” Haddon said. “It’s based out of Detroit and Los Angeles, and there’s a soundtrack to the movie that’s incredible.” 
Innovative ideas and creativity have helped Haddon evolve and develop into the artist he is today. 
“When you decide to do gospel, it’s already been lightyears behind other genres, so even though I have a 30-year career with 19 records, there’s still work to do because it’s been in a certain space. Which is good because it keeps me innovative, creative and it helps me evolve and develop who I am,” Haddon said. 
Plans to retire aren’t in Haddon’s near future, and he plans to keep growing and evolving as an artist. 
“There’s a greater calling. There’s something bigger than this one generation to be etched in the sands of time. Until everybody in the world knows who Deitrick is and my work, [I’ve] got work to do,” Haddon said.
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